post-herpetic Neuralgia

Clinical observation of post-herpetic neuralgia treated with TCM herbal cupping therapy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the difference in the efficacy on post-herpetic neuralgia among TCM herbal cupping therapy, Chinese medicine thermal compressing therapy and mecobalamine.

METHODS:

Fifty-seven cases were randomized into a TCM herbal cupping group, a thermal compressing group and a western medicine group, 19 cases in each one. The oral administration of ibuprofen was applied in every group. In the herbal cupping group, the bamboo cups soaked in the boiled Chinese herbal decoction were sucked on the most significant painful area. In the thermal compressing group, the towel soaked in the boiled Chinese herbal decoction was compressed on the most significant painful area. In the medication group, the muscular injection of mecobalamine was adopted. The treatment was given once a day, for 2 weeks totally in each group. SF-MPQ score and clinical efficacy before and after treatment were observed in each group.

RESULTS:

The remarkable effective rates were 78.9{} (15/19), 36.8{} (7/19) and 5.3{} (1/19) in the TCM herbal cupping group, thermal compressing group and western medicine group separately. The efficacy in the TCM herbal cupping group was significantly superior to the thermal compressing group and western medicine group (all P < 0.05), and that in the thermal compressing group was superior to the western medicine group (P < 0.05). After treatment, SF-MPQ score was reduced significantly in each group (P < 0.001, P < 0.01). The score in the herbal cupping group was reduced more significantly as compared with the thermal compressing group and western medicine group (all P < 0.01). The improvement in pain in the thermal compressing group was superior to the western medicine group (P < 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

TCM herbal cupping therapy achieves the superior efficacy for post-herpetic neuralgia and relieves pain effectively of the patients, which is more advantageous than CM herbal thermal compressing therapy and Mecobalamine.

Possible effects of acupuncture on atrial fibrillation and post-herpetic neuralgia–a case report.

 Abstract

A 72 year old female with a main complaint of severe post-herpetic neuralgia and a secondary complaint of atrial fibrillation (AF) received two series of acupuncture treatments totalling 20 treatments over a four month period. Her standard medical treatment remained unchanged. The primary focus of the acupuncture was pain relief; however, two acupuncture points (PC6, SP4) were included in both treatment series because of possible effects on both costal or chest pain and cardiac arrhythmias, according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) teaching and limited research. As recorded by her pacemaker, estimated weekly episodes of AF in the patient decreased significantly, and percentage time in AF decreased with borderline statistical significance, from the pretreatment estimates during the second series of treatments (weekly AF episode estimates: pretreatment=71.4; second series=16.5, difference estimates=-54.9, 95{} CI -6.5 to -103.3, P=0.02; percentage time in AF estimates: pretreatment=30.6; 2 second series=18.0, difference estimates=-12.6, 95{} CI 0.9 to -26.0, P=0.08). The pain levels were also significantly reduced following the acupuncture treatment series by more than 67{}. Further studies are warranted to further explore these observations of a possible effect of acupuncture on both atrial fibrillation and post-herpetic neuralgia.

Post herpetic neuralgia.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

During the past decade, important advances have been made in understanding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of post herpetic neuralgia pain as well as treatment of other neuropathic pain conditions. PHN is accepted as a model for management and clinical trials of neuropathic pain of less clear etiologies. In palliative medicine, where the etiology of pain may be nociceptive, neuropathic, or mixed, it is frequently to the research on PHN that we turn in order to extrapolate the data to the patients at hand.

OBJECTIVE:

To review and summarize what is known about epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and prevention strategies for post herpetic neuralgia. Discuss the available including the most recent therapeutic options as regards to their mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and tolerability in an attempt to explain the rationale for their use.

CONCLUSION:

A multidisciplinary and integrative approach has the best chance of success in the management of patients with PHN pain, a problem that can be often frustrating to the patient and challenging to the clinician. Prevention strategies for PHN include administration of zoster vaccine, treatment with antiviral therapy within 72 hours of rash onset and aggressive pain control. First and second line pharmacotherapy include anticonvulsants, antidepressants, topical lidocaine, high dose capsaicin, and opioids either used individually or in combination. Interventional techniques play a limited role in the management of PHN although some data indicate that Intrathecal methylprednisolone and spinal cord stimulation may be effective.