Osteoarthritis

Diagnosis and management of knee osteoarthritis: Chinese medicine expert consensus (2015)

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Abstract

Literature review shows that Chinese medicine and other related treatment are still the main stream treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Currently, there is short of handbook guiding Chinese medicine from evidence-based medical evidence, so it is a top priority to develop a clinical guideline from the expert consensus. After several rounds of discussion during the conference and examination by letter, which has collected opinions from nearly one hundred experts, consensus was reached. Nonpharmacologic interventions include health education, medical exercise, acupuncture, massage, acupotomology, and physiotherapy. Pharmacological interventions are as follows. Topical application includes fumigation, application, hot compressed, ironing and iontophoresis with Chinese herbs, etc. Chinese patent medicine for external use includes plaster, ointment, etc. Western medicine for external use mainly includes emulsion, ointment, plaster and embrocation containing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Intraarticular injection mainly includes sodium hyaluronic acid, chitosan (for injection) with prudent use of glucocorticoid. Chinese herbal medicine and Chinese patent medicine can be taken referring to syndrome differentiation which mainly includes syndromes of qi stagnation and blood stasis, cold dampness, deficiency of Gan (Liver) and Shen (Kidney), deficiency of qi and blood. Western medicine mainly includes analgesic, NSAIDs, diseases modifying drugs. Surgery procedures mainly include joint irrigation, arthroscopic surgery, osteotomy, arthroplasty, etc.

Acupuncture as an adjunct therapy for osteoarthritis in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

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Abstract

Acupuncture is an ancient practice that is currently used to treat disorders ranging from osteoarthritis to cardiomyopathy. Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin, sterile needles into defined acupuncture points that stimulate physiologic processes through neural signaling. Numerous scientific studies have proven the benefits of acupuncture, and given this scientific support, we hypothesized that acupuncture could benefit the nonhuman primates at our facility. As our chimpanzee colony ages, we are observing an increase in osteoarthritis and have focused our initial acupuncture treatments on this condition. We successfully trained 3 chimpanzees, by using positive-reinforcement training techniques, to voluntarily participate in acupuncture treatments for stifle osteoarthritis. We used 3 acupuncture points that correlate with alleviation of stifle pain and inflammation in humans. A mobility scoring system was used to assess improvements in mobility as a function of the acupuncture treatments. The 2 chimpanzees with the most severe osteoarthritis showed significant improvement in mobility after acupuncture treatments. Acupuncture therapy not only resulted in improved mobility, but the training sessions also served as enrichment for the animals, as demonstrated by their voluntary participation in the training and treatment sessions. Acupuncture is an innovative treatment technique that our data show to be safe, inexpensive, and, most importantly, effective for chimpanzees.

Acupuncture for joint symptoms related to aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer: a narrative review.

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CONCLUSIONS:

Acupuncture is safe and results in improvement in AIMSS symptoms, but similar benefits are also elicited by non-penetrating sham acupuncture. Future research should seek to establish the durability of improvements.