Male sexual dysfunction

[Chinese herbal medicine enhances sexual function and c-Fos/nNOS expression in the nucleus accumbens of orchidectomized rats].

Abstract

RESULTS:

There was a decrease in accessory genital organ weight, plasma testosterone, and sexual behavior, as well as a low number of c-Fos-positive cells and a large nNOS-positive cell area in orchidectomized rats. Administration of the herbal medicine increased accessory genital organ weight, testosterone level, mating behavior, and c-Fos-positive cell number, while it decreased the nNOS-positive cell area in orchidectomized rats.

CONCLUSION:

An increase of plasma testosterone after administration of “kidney-nourishing” herbal medicine might contribute to the elevated sexual function and activity in orchidectomized rats. In addition, a central nervous system mechanism, such as the functional alteration of NAc, might be involved. Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether the central nervous system is involved in the effect of Chinese herbal medicine on sexual function recovery in orchidectomized rats.

METHODS:

Orchidectomized rats were administered intragastrically with a decoction of “kidney-nourishing” Chinese herbal medicine once per day for 28 days. Accessory genital organ weight, plasma testosterone, and mating behavior were investigated. The expression of c-Fos and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in neuronal cells in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry.

Efficacy of acupuncture treatment of sexual dysfunction secondary to antidepressants.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antidepressants including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are known to cause secondary sexual dysfunction with prevalence rates as high as 50{}-90{}. Emerging research is establishing that acupuncture may be an effective treatment modality for sexual dysfunction including impotence, loss of libido, and an inability to orgasm.

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to examine the potential benefits of acupuncture in the management of sexualdysfunction secondary to SSRIs and SNRIs.

SUBJECTS:

Practitioners at the START Clinic referred participants experiencing adverse sexual events from their antidepressant medication for acupuncture treatment at the Mood and Anxiety Disorders, a tertiary care mood and anxiety disorder clinic in Toronto.

DESIGN:

Participants received a Traditional Chinese Medicine assessment and followed an acupuncture protocol for 12 consecutive weeks. The acupuncture points used were Kidney 3, Governing Vessel 4, Urinary Bladder 23, with Heart 7 and Pericardium 6. Participants also completed a questionnaire package on a weekly basis.

OUTCOMES MEASURED:

The questionnaire package consisted of self-report measures assessing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and various aspects of sexual function.

RESULTS:

Significant improvement among male participants was noted in all areas of sexual functioning, as well as in both anxiety and depressive symptoms. Female participants reported a significant improvement in libido and lubrication and a nonsignificant trend toward improvement in several other areas of function.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests a potential role for acupuncture in the treatment of the sexual side-effects of SSRIs and SNRIs as well for a potential benefit of integrating medical and complementary and alternative practitioners.

Overview of the relevant literature on the possible role of acupuncture in treating male sexualdysfunction.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To systematically review scientific reports on the effectiveness of acupuncture to treat male sexual dysfunction.

METHODS:

The Medline database was searched for published clinical trials of acupuncture for erectile dysfunction (ED) and premature ejaculation (PE) with English abstracts. Risk of bias was assessed for randomised controlled trials (RCTs).

RESULTS:

Seven studies on two conditions of male sexual dysfunction met the inclusion criteria. Three out of four RCTs were patient-blinded, but all had a high risk of bias. Three suggested that acupuncture has a therapeutic effect as compared with sham acupuncture. Comparisons with paroxetine were inconsistent. Other uncontrolled studies and case series suggested satisfactory improvements of ED and PE after acupuncture.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acupuncture appears to have promise for treating male sexual dysfunction, but in view of the small number of studies and their variable quality, doubts remain about its effectiveness. Further studies are justified.